Welcome to the Rutgers University French Department's Placement Test.  Please do your best on this test without reference to any dictionaries or French textbook.  Remember that the purpose of the test is to evaluate your current skills in French so that we can find the most appropriate course for your continued study.  You will not receive credit from this test.  Once you place into a course, you may not take a lower course for credit.  Note:  you can only take this placement test once.

Please read the following about the WebCAPE Placement Test:

  • In your internet browser, go to: http://webcape.org/nwcregister.php?acct=rutgers
  • Enter password:  knights     (all lowercase)
  • Read introduction from WebCAPE about the test.  Click Begin.
  • Complete all of the fields in the student survey.  It is important to have as much information as possible in case there is a problem matching your test score with your name.  Please enter your RUID number carefully.  This is the number that you received upon applying to Rutgers. 
  • When you have entered all of the requested information, click on "Continue".  The first screen is a practice item.  After that, you will begin the test.
  • Do NOT use your browser's BACK button during the exam or it will be interrupted and you will have to re-register to continue.
  • Your placement score will be displayed at the end of the exam.  Be sure to click on "Finished" to send a copy of this information to Rutgers.   You may want to print out the page for your records.
  • If you receive an error indicating "too many connections," please refresh the page and continue working.  If necessary, you can log into the exam again and follow the directions near the button labeled 'Resume' on the identity/survey page. 
  • Please note:  your placement score will be displayed on the screen at the end of the exam.  Your placement level will also be available in enrollment pathway and degree navigator approximately one week after taking the exam. 
  • You may also want to seek an advisor’s recommendation to help you choose the appropriate course depending on your level.  Therefore, we recommend that you take the exam well in advance of registration.
 
                           
                     

French Department Undergraduate Learning Goals

 
1a. The attainment of basic proficiency in the French language In our lower division courses students learn to speak, read, and write grammatical French through class instruction, oral laboratory and reading and writing exercises.

1b. Exposure of undergraduates to French language and culture Students with no prior knowledge of French are given the opportunity to explore French literature and culture thanks to courses in English which include a few select examples of untranslated documents. Additional reading courses  bridge the gap between these culture courses in English and our standard elementary language courses.

2. In our gateway to the Minor and Major students develop fluency in written and spoken expression and basic skills in critical thinking and in the analysis and interpretation of literary texts. Two advanced-level language courses (Advanced Grammar and Composition, and Composition and Stylistics), and two introductory courses to the early and modern periods of French literature (Aspects of French Literature, 215 and 216) train students to think and express themselves critically on topics of culture and literature.  The learning goals of these courses are consistent with the University’s newly defined learning goals in the category of writing and communication: “- communicate complex ideas effectively, in standard French [the original statement reads English] to a general audience. - evaluate and critically assess sources and use the conventions of attribution and citation correctly.” (Preliminary draft of Learning Goals, SAS Faculty Forum, February 14, 2008).

3. In a wide variety of upper-division courses students acquire advanced proficiency in French; a solid knowledge of French and Francophone culture and literature; and analytical skills within the areas of French linguistics, cultural, or literary studies (reflecting the three options within our major).

4. Senior French majors develop research skills and readiness for post-graduate study. All of our majors are required to take a senior seminar in the Cultural, Literary Studies or Linguistics options. These courses assign ten to fifteen page research papers that require  advanced writing and research and critical skills. Ten to fifteen percent of our graduating majors also choose to write an Honors thesis in French or an Interdisciplinary thesis. This 35 to 50-page thesis is expected to attain the level of beginning graduate work in French studies. The goals of these capstone experiences are consistent with the University’s newly defined learning goals in the category of writing and communication: “- communicate effectively to a specialized academic audience in a mode appropriate to the discipline. - think analytically and synthesize information and ideas called from multiple sources, engaging with other writers, researchers, and thinkers, in order to generate new insights or understandings worthy of expression.” (Preliminary draft of Learning Goals, SAS Faculty Forum, February 14, 2008).  French faculty regularly mentor the top 5% to 10% of the class toward graduate studies by following the students’ performance on GRE exams and advising them through the application process.

                                                                            

 Majoring in French

French Majors must take 33 credits of French with a concentration in one of
the following three areas. For all three areas, six of the required 400 level credits
must be taken with professors of French in the School of Arts and Sciences:

French Literary Studies

  • Must take 213 and 214
  • Must take 215 OR 217 (you cannot take both)
  • Must take 216 OR 218 (you cannot take both)
  • Must take an additional seven courses at the 300 and 400 levels.  Of these seven courses:
    – three courses must be at the 400 level, including the senior seminar 480
    – five must be in literature
    – one may be taken in English and/or outside the French Department
       on a French or Francophonic subject (French Department approval is required)

French Cultural Studies

  • Must take 213 and 214
  • Must take 215 OR 217 (you cannot take both)
  • Must take 216 OR 218 (you cannot take both)
  • Must take 315 and 316
  • Must take an additional five courses at the 300 and 400 level.  Of these five courses:
    – three courses must be at the 400 level, including the senior seminar 481
    – two must be in literature
    – one may be taken in English and/or outside the French Department
       on a French or Francophonic subject (French Department approval is required)

French Linguistics

  • Must take 213 and 214
  • Must take 215 OR 217 (you cannot take both)
  • Must take 216 OR 218 (you cannot take both)
  • Must take 615:201 (in the Department of Linguistics)
  • Must take an additional six courses at the 300 and 400 levels.  Of these six courses:  
    – four must be in French Linguistics and/or history of the French Language
    – three must be at the 400 level
    – one may be taken in English and/or taken in the Department of Linguistics

History / French Double Major

  • This interdisciplinary major includes the following:
  • 18 credits in History, 24 credits in French (131-2, 215-6, advanced courses), and a senior seminar
  • For more information please go to:  History / French Double Major.

Minoring in French

  • Must take six courses given in French.  Of these six courses:
  • Only one of the following may count toward the minor:  131, 132, 137, 210, 213, 214
  • Must take 215 OR 217 (you cannot take both)
  • Must take 216 OR 218 (you cannot take both)
  • Three courses must be at the 300 level or above
  • Optional:  One required 300-level course can be replaced with both 420:213 AND 420:214,
    in which case a total of seven courses are required to complete the minor.
  • Optional:  One required 300-level course can be replaced with two French literature or culture courses
    taught in English, in which case a total of seven courses are required to complete the minor.

Should I major or minor in French?

 

For ideas about this, please go to the page with testimonials by recent
graduates.  We hope you find their comments to be informative and inspiring.

                             For testimonials, please click here.

  

Program Description

The History / French double major is an interdisciplinary program designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of France and its history. The program combines the offerings of the History and French Departments to form a coherent curriculum that joins the rigorous historical study of France or related Francophone countries with the in-depth study of literature and culture, including mastery of the language.

This program provides excellent preparation for graduate studies in History, French, and Global, Cultural, or International Studies, for other professional study, or for employment in related areas.

Students completing the program will acquire the following:  competence in the French language; general knowledge of French literature and culture and of the tools used in its study; knowledge of French and Francophone history and the methods of historical study; and more advanced knowledge of the French or Francophone areas they choose to investigate at a senior undergraduate level.

Please note that acceptance into this major requires an in-person meeting with an advisor in the history department. Please visit Van Dyck Hall, room 111 to speak with a history advisor. The Major should be discussed with the Undergraduate Director in French as well.

Program Outline

Students take 45 credits, distributed as follows:

  • 18 credits in the Department of History.
    • 6 credits in French History (510: 331, 333, 335 or others by approval). These courses have as their primary subject the history of France or a French-speaking region.
    • 12 credits in either French History or adjacent domains "Adjacent domains" courses treat areas or topics with a close relation to French history, including non-European Francophone cultures. See list below.
  • 24 credits in the Department of French.
    • 9 credits of French language courses.
    Students may count only 1 of 420: 131, 132, 210.
    Students may not count 420: 101, 102, 105 or 121.
    • 6 credits as follows: 420: 215 (or 217) and 216 (or 218).
    These courses have pre-requisite of 200-level placement or successful
    completion of 420:132.
    • 9 credits on the 300 and 400 levels, at least 3 of which have to be on the 400 level.
  • 3 credits for a senior seminar jointly offered by History and French.
    (taught in English with supplemental materials in French).

Sample four-year program for a student completing a History/French major:

Year
French
History
1 420: 131-2 (1 counts towards major) 510: 101,102 (Dev. Europe)
2 215-216
213-214
2 French History or adjacent
3 1 300 level
1 300 level
2 French History or adjacent
4 1 400 level 1 joint senior seminar

(Sample only; individual programs will vary widely)

Note that this program leaves ample room for the student to complete College distribution requirements, as well as, if desired, a second major, and to participate in study abroad or Honors. Students are encouraged to consider shaping their program to develop broad competency in specific areas, such as Francophone studies, medieval studies, modern France, and the like. Technical Options and remarks

  • One college or FAS honors seminar on an appropriate History / French topic may be counted towards the major, with written approval of an advisor.
  • In the event no senior seminar is taught in a given year, a student may substitute, with written approval from an advisor, a college or department honors project, a graduate course that requires a long research paper, or a senior seminar in French or History.
  • If 6 of the French credits are taken on the 400 level, the remaining 3 can be taken in a French course taught in English.
  • One course given outside the History and French Departments on a topic directly related to French History may be counted towards the major requirements, with written approval from an advisor. Example: 082:351 "Art in France," or a special seminar on "Paris/Tokyo — 1700 to the Present."
  • Credit towards the major for courses transferred from other institutions requires written approval. Of the required 8 upper-level courses, at least 4 must be taken with New Brunswick faculty.
  • "Adjacent domains" courses in History include:
    •    321 Age of Enlightenment
         323 Age of Absolutism and Revolution
         325 Nineteenth-century Europe
         327 Twentieth-century Europe
         343 England, 1485-1789

510: 101, 102 Development of Europe                
       363 Germany since 1914
       417 First World War
       427 Intellectual History of Modern Europe
       445 Industrial Revolution

508: 322 West Africa
       422 African Cultural History
Other courses may be added upon written approval of an advisor.

 

Graduate Schools attended by recent French majors include:

  • Columbia University
  • New York University
  • Princeton University
  • University of California at Irvine
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • Yale University

Find Out What’s Possible:

* Immerse yourself in French language and culture on campus by living in the French House at Douglass or by participating in the French “Living and Learning” community on College Avenue.

* Take advantage of the French Resource Center which helps students to find internships and teaching assistantships in France.

* Participate in the Rutgers Summer Program in Paris, where classes are taught in the morning, afternoons are spent visiting neighborhoods and museums, and evenings are dedicated to theater, music and dance.

* Obtain interdisciplinary certificates in areas such as International Studies, French Commerce, and Romance Linguistics.  Interdisciplinary studies involving French can also be pursued through the minors in Medieval Studies and Cinema Studies.

* Earn course credits for teaching beginning French and engaging children in art, puppet theater, cooking and other aspects of French and Francophone culture in a New Brunswick elementary school.

* Combine the offerings of two departments in a unique French/History major providing a rigorous study of the history of France and other French-speaking countries and an in-depth study of their literatures and cultures.

* Participate in University-wide activities and programs with an international focus. French majors have been involved in projects based in the Zimmerli Art Museum and in the Center for European Studies.

 

Contact Us

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Academic Building, 4th floor
15 Seminary Place
College Avenue Campus
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
french1@rci.rutgers.edu