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Affiliated Faculty

Jean-Louis Hippolyte

Associate Professor of French

Phone:  (848) 932-8223

Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

hippolyte

Education:

B.A. (English) Université Michel de Montaigne (Bordeaux III)
M.A. (English) Université Michel de Montaigne (Bordeaux III)
M.A. (French) University of Colorado at Boulder
PhD. (French) University of Colorado at Boulder

Fields of Research:

My area of specialization is Twentieth-Century French Literature.

My teaching interests include French language and culture, contemporary literature and criticism; French cinema; the intersection of discourses in the humanities and the sciences, notably chaos theory and fuzzy logic; the fantastic and magical realism; crime fiction, popularculture and literature; and the writing of otherness.

My book on contemporary French literature, entitled Fuzzy Fiction (University of Nebraska Press), was published in December 2006. In this book, I underscore the capital importance of fuzziness, both figuratively and structurally, in the contemporary novel. The postmodern self is an undetermined ego, a fuzzy subject, contingent and ephemeral, speaking through a fractal narrator, but one which still functions as a narrative agency, one that takes to task the kaleidoscopic or variable nature of the real. In fact, the paradoxical coincidence of order and disorder, the seemingly infinite exploration of narrative options, the principle of undifferentiated identity, all participate of a general poetics of vagueness.

I also co-authored Septième Art, a textbook on French cinema, with David Aldstadt.

Books (click on image for details):

fuzzyfictionbyhippolyte

septiemeartbyhippolyteiii

 

 

 

Other Publications:

  • “Jeunet: Carnaval postmoderne,” Contemporary French Civilization [forthcoming]
  • “L’anti-biographe, ou les absences de Chevillard,” Romanciers minimalistes : 1979-2003 (Paris: Presses Sorbonne Nouvelle, 2012) : 245-53.
  • “Paranoia and Christianity in Maurice Dantec’s Crime Fiction,” Studies in 20th and 21st Century Literature 33.1 (2009): 86-101.
  • “Houle du virtuel,” Ecritures Contemporaines 8 (2006): 127-40.
  • “Christian Oster: From Courtly Love to Modern Malaise,” SubStance: A Review of Theory and Literary Criticism 35.3 (2006): 23-34.
  • "Minor Angels: Toward an Aesthetics of Conflict," SubStance: A Review of Theory and Literary Criticism 32.2 (2003): 67-78.
  • "A Tokyo comme à Bastia: Le non-lieu chez Jean-Philippe Toussaint", Entre parenthèses: Beitrage zum Werk von Jean-Philippe Toussaint (Paderborn: Vigilia, 2003): 117-25.

Graduate Courses:

  • L'Extrême contemporain (graduate seminar)
  • French Cinema
  • Crime Fiction
  • Fantasy Literature of France

Undergraduate Courses:

  • French Civilization
  • Introduction to Francophone Literature
  • Paranoia in 20th French Literature & Film
  • Crime & Punishment (French Crime Fiction)
  • France at War (Special Topics)
  • French Film
  • Flights of Fancy: Fantasy in French
  • Literature and Film
  • 19th Century French Literature
  • 20th Century French Fiction and Film
  • Modern French Readings
  • Postmodern French Cinema
  • 20th Century French Novel (Survey)
  • Survey of French Literature, 19th & 20th Century
  • French Literature, Middle-Ages - 18th Century (Survey)

Program Connections:

French Program at Camden Homepage
http://www.camden.rutgers.edu/dept-pages/forlangs/french/

European Studies Program at Camden Homepage:
http://europeanstudies.camden.rutgers.edu/index.html

Contact Us


Academic Building, 4th floor
15 Seminary Place
College Avenue Campus
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
french1@rci.rutgers.edu